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Major #Floods and #Landslides Strikes Many Districts in #Kerala, #India

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Hundreds #evacuated near #LakeComo after landslide triggered by heavy rain hits Italian town

Capsized cars as seen the roads of after they were hit by a landslide in Casargo, near the Italian town of Lecco, in the early hours of Wednesday, Aug. 7.  

Capsized cars as seen the roads of after they were hit by a landslide in Casargo, near the Italian town of Lecco, in the early hours of Wednesday, Aug. 7. (ANSA via AP)

Around 200 people have been evacuated after a landslide hit a northern Italian town near Lake Como, overturning cars in its wake.

The town of Casargo in the Lombardy region was hit by a landslide Tuesday evening that was triggered by torrential downpours.

No casualties have been reported, but authorities continue to remove debris and wreckage from the community’s streets.

Farmers, who raise goats and cows in the region, also remain cut off due to blocked roads, agricultural lobby group Coldiretti said.

Rescuers work to clear mud from a road in Codesino, near the northern Italian town of Lecco, in the early hours of Wednesday, Aug. 7.
Rescuers work to clear mud from a road in Codesino, near the northern Italian town of Lecco, in the early hours of Wednesday, Aug. 7. (ANSA via AP)

The sheer force of the landslide, which turned into a torrent of mud, tore down fences and engulfed cars in its path. Officials who evacuated civilians and tourists moved people to safety in a local hotel.

“The regional offices and civil protection volunteers are working to bring the situation back to normal as soon as possible,” said Attilio Fonatana, president of the Lombardy region.

During the landslide, a nearby bridge with unmanned vehicles on it collapsed while strong winds uprooted trees, Italian newspaper La Repubblica reported.

Lombardy has been repeatedly hit with flooding and poor weather conditions in recent weeks; Italy has also endured various heatwaves and freak storms, leaving several dead and causing millions in damages to the country’s agriculture.

Courtesy of foxnews.com

https://tinyurl.com/y648aayz

Hundreds of #cattle dead due to the worst #drought in 30 years in #Tabasco, #Mexico

Livestock Alert

The Los Ríos area of the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco is suffering the worst drought in the last 30 years , causing an 80 percent stoppage in agricultural activity and heavy losses for livestock .

The largest river in Mexico, the Usumacinta , registers historically low levels, while in Balancán and Tenosique, municipalities bordering Guatemala , the arid landscape extends over the plain over crops and killing the herd of hunger and thirst that exceeds 390 thousand heads

The cracked earth is visible in large areas, with crops of sorghum and corn that remain standing, but without life, and there is no fishing for the drying of the rivers.

In the ranches, the jagüeyes-deep pools of water-are full of mud, and near them abound the dead and dying carcasses.

Balancán, one of the municipalities that make up the Los Ríos area, authorities attribute the balance to the absence of rain.

Courtesy of sinembargo.mx

https://tinyurl.com/y4tj87nv

Millions of #locusts targets #Sardinia, #Italy

Locust Alert

Millions of locusts have been causing “considerable damage” to crops and food for livestock, according to a local farmers’ union.

Italy’s farming association Coldiretti says millions of locusts are causing “considerable damage” to parts of the island, which runs a risk of “seriously compromising part of the harvest”.

Leonardo Salis, the president of Coldiretti’s Nuoro chapter, said the locusts were “devouring everything they encounter” and in some cases “leaving animals without grassland”.

#Record #May #Snowfall In #Switzerland

Snow Alert

Areas of Switzerland saw record snowfall for the month of May overnight from Saturday into Sunday. Most snow fell in the central and eastern alpine regions, but the most dramatic records were observed in lower-lying Bern and St Gallen.

The Swiss capital of Bern woke up to four centimetres of fresh snow on Sunday morning. The previous record for the month was one centimetre in 1945.

The eastern city of St Gallen saw 19 centimetres of snow, up from the 12 centimetres recorded on May 7, 1957, according to the Swiss meteorological service MeteoSwissexternal link.

People have been advised not to take walks in wooded areas, especially in deciduous regions, as wet snow caught in trees could cause branches to fall off.

Weather forecasters have warned of further problems likely to be caused by the unseasonal cold snap next early week. MeteoSwiss forecasts sharp groundfrost in the lowlands on Monday and Tuesday.

Vineyards and the strawberry crop may be threatened by these adverse weather conditions. Two years’ ago, the Swiss fruit farming industry suffered heavy losses as a result of late frosts. Vineyards were badly hit, as were cherry, apricot and apple harvests.

However, the damage is predicted to be less severe this time around as the frost will come a few weeks later, after many trees have already blossomed.

Courtesy of swissinfo.ch

https://tinyurl.com/y5yoeyx4

#Historic #Arctic front moving across #Europe this weekend, May 3-6th

Arctic Blast Alert

A very intense Arctic front is moving south across Europe this weekend and is expected to bring unusually low temperatures, snow and dangerous frost into some vulnerable areas on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Some areas could experience morning temperatures well below zero, which would be potentially devastating for vineyards and agriculture. Overall, very cold days are expected across much of our continent through mid next week, while it remains mild and warm across the Iberian peninsula.

Courtesy of severe-weather.eu

https://tinyurl.com/y5umedtx

More than 33,000 cattle and 45 people killed and also 17,400 homes destroyed by flooding in Niger, Africa

Disaster Alert

Forty-five people have died in the arid west African country of Niger in flooding since June, and nearly 209 000 have been affected, the UN said on Tuesday.

The rains destroyed nearly 17 400 homes, killed more than 33 000 livestock and damaged crops, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said.

Nearly 8 000 hectares of millet, maize and bean fields were inundated, it said.

The government had given a far lower figure, citing 469 people affected.

The three-month rainy season is coming to an end but it has caused flooding in many areas, including in the desert north.

Courtesy of news24.com

https://tinyurl.com/yam65utl

STATE OF EMERGENCY DECLARED DUE TO MAJOR FLOODING IN NIGER, KOGI, ANAMBRA AND DELTA

State Of Emergency
As many as 100 people have died in flooding in Nigeria over the past two weeks, according to disaster management authorities. Thousands are thought to have been displaced, particularly in communities along the country’s major rivers.
 
Over the past few weeks many areas have experience localized flash flooding due to storms bringing high intensity rainfall, including in Jigawa, Niger, Kano and Nasarawa states.
 
However, wide areas of the country now face flooding from the country’s major rivers after long-term rainfall in Nigeria and river catchments in neighbouring countries caused the Niger and Benue rivers to rise to danger levels.  Earlier this week Nigeria’s National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) declared a state of emergency for flooding in the four states of Niger, Kogi, Anambra and Delta.
 
Other affected States have been placed under close watch, including the states of Kebbi, Kwara, Edo, Rivers, Bayelsa, Adamawa, Taraba, Benue and Nasarawa.
 
NEMA has set up 5 Emergency Operation Centres (EOC) to facilitate prompt search and rescue operations as well as humanitarian supports in the states worst affected by flooding. According to NEMA, the Emergency Response Centres will be responsible for planning, organizing, directing and supervising deployment of resources with the affected state governments and local authorities and communities. “The primary objective is to localize the responses and expedite intervention to save lives and facilitate quick recovery,” NEMA Director General Mustapha Maihaja said.
 
In late August Nigeria’s Hydrological Services Agency (NIHSA) warned communities in Kebbi, Niger, Kwara, Kogi, Anambra, Delta and Bayelsa states that increasingly high river levels could cause major flooding. Major dams had already begun releasing water as high flow from the upper catchment of the Niger basin moved downstream to Nigeria.
 
As of 30 August, the Niger river at Lokoja stood at 8.84 metres, above the 8 metre warning level and rising towards 10 metre red alert. Lokoja is the capital of Kogi State and lies at the confluence of the Niger and Benue rivers and downstream of the Kainji and Jebba dams.
 
As of 07 September the Niger river at Lokoja stood at 10.01 metres and by 18 September had reached 11.06 metres. NIHSA says that rivers are at similar levels to those seen in the lead up to the devastating floods of 2012. On 29 September 2012 the Niger river at Lokoja reached a record high of 12.84 metres.
 
The River Benue is also rising, though it is not yet at levels similar to those of 2012. NIHSA says that water releases from the Shiroro, Kainji and Jebba Dams is contributing to the rise in river levels. The Lagdo Dam in Cameroon however is not releasing water, according to NIHSA.
 
According to forecasts from NiMet, further heavy rain can be expected over the next 3 weeks, particularly in northern areas of the country.
 
NIHSA said that flash flooding is also likely to continue in some areas and communities should prepare.
 
“Localized urban flooding incidents being witnessed in some cities and communities in the country are expected to continue due to high rainfall intensity of shorter duration, rainstorms, blockage of drainage system and poor urban planning, as well as coastal flooding resulting from sea rise and storm surges. States and Local Governments should endeavour to remove structures built within the floodplains, clear blocked drainages, culverts and other waterways,” NIHSA added.
Courtesy of floodlist.com