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Devastating #flooding swept away homes in parts of #Oklahoma, #USA

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Thousands of dead #fish found in a #dam in #SaoPaulo, #Brazil

Fish Kill Alert

Fishermen, environmentalists and residents of the Billings dam in São Bernardo do Campo, in the state of São Paulo, were alarmed by scenes of thousands of dead fish that were seen floating in the waters of the dam over the weekend.

They are fish of various species and sizes. The cause of animal death is not yet known.

The Environmental Company of the State of São Paulo (Cetesb) said that technicians are surveying the Billings dam and will investigate the cause of the fish deaths.

Courtesy of g1.globo.com

https://tinyurl.com/y5zb8ktm

About 100 TONS of #fish #die in the #Castanhão #dam in #Ceará, #Brazil

Fish Kill Alert

About 100 tons of dead fish were taken from the Castanhão reservoir on Saturday morning in Jaguaribara, Ceará. Since last Thursday (7), fish are seen on the spot.

According to the city hall, the producers of the regions of Curupati, Jaburu and near the office of the National Department of Works Against Droughts (Dnocs), lost all tilapia production.

The causes of the deaths are being investigated, but the main suspect is that they were caused by the oxygen decrease in the water from the dam, which currently accounts for less than 4% of its capacity.

Throughout Saturday, using tractors and buckets, city officials worked to remove fish from the water to prevent contamination.

In a statement, the city council said that through the Departments of Aquaculture and Fisheries and Infrastructure will provide all necessary support to fish farmers in the region.

Courtesy of g1.globo.com

https://tinyurl.com/y4spvm6t

STATE OF EMERGENCY DECLARED DUE TO MAJOR FLOODING IN NIGER, KOGI, ANAMBRA AND DELTA

State Of Emergency
As many as 100 people have died in flooding in Nigeria over the past two weeks, according to disaster management authorities. Thousands are thought to have been displaced, particularly in communities along the country’s major rivers.
 
Over the past few weeks many areas have experience localized flash flooding due to storms bringing high intensity rainfall, including in Jigawa, Niger, Kano and Nasarawa states.
 
However, wide areas of the country now face flooding from the country’s major rivers after long-term rainfall in Nigeria and river catchments in neighbouring countries caused the Niger and Benue rivers to rise to danger levels.  Earlier this week Nigeria’s National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) declared a state of emergency for flooding in the four states of Niger, Kogi, Anambra and Delta.
 
Other affected States have been placed under close watch, including the states of Kebbi, Kwara, Edo, Rivers, Bayelsa, Adamawa, Taraba, Benue and Nasarawa.
 
NEMA has set up 5 Emergency Operation Centres (EOC) to facilitate prompt search and rescue operations as well as humanitarian supports in the states worst affected by flooding. According to NEMA, the Emergency Response Centres will be responsible for planning, organizing, directing and supervising deployment of resources with the affected state governments and local authorities and communities. “The primary objective is to localize the responses and expedite intervention to save lives and facilitate quick recovery,” NEMA Director General Mustapha Maihaja said.
 
In late August Nigeria’s Hydrological Services Agency (NIHSA) warned communities in Kebbi, Niger, Kwara, Kogi, Anambra, Delta and Bayelsa states that increasingly high river levels could cause major flooding. Major dams had already begun releasing water as high flow from the upper catchment of the Niger basin moved downstream to Nigeria.
 
As of 30 August, the Niger river at Lokoja stood at 8.84 metres, above the 8 metre warning level and rising towards 10 metre red alert. Lokoja is the capital of Kogi State and lies at the confluence of the Niger and Benue rivers and downstream of the Kainji and Jebba dams.
 
As of 07 September the Niger river at Lokoja stood at 10.01 metres and by 18 September had reached 11.06 metres. NIHSA says that rivers are at similar levels to those seen in the lead up to the devastating floods of 2012. On 29 September 2012 the Niger river at Lokoja reached a record high of 12.84 metres.
 
The River Benue is also rising, though it is not yet at levels similar to those of 2012. NIHSA says that water releases from the Shiroro, Kainji and Jebba Dams is contributing to the rise in river levels. The Lagdo Dam in Cameroon however is not releasing water, according to NIHSA.
 
According to forecasts from NiMet, further heavy rain can be expected over the next 3 weeks, particularly in northern areas of the country.
 
NIHSA said that flash flooding is also likely to continue in some areas and communities should prepare.
 
“Localized urban flooding incidents being witnessed in some cities and communities in the country are expected to continue due to high rainfall intensity of shorter duration, rainstorms, blockage of drainage system and poor urban planning, as well as coastal flooding resulting from sea rise and storm surges. States and Local Governments should endeavour to remove structures built within the floodplains, clear blocked drainages, culverts and other waterways,” NIHSA added.
Courtesy of floodlist.com

MAJOR FLOODING KILLS DOZENS AND DISPLACES 100,000 PEOPLE IN NORTHERN GHANA

Severe Flood Warning
Long-term heavy rainfall combined with water releases from the Bagre Dam in Burkina Faso, have caused severe flooding in northern Ghana over the past few weeks.
 
Ghana’s National Disaster Management Organization (NADMO) said that at least 34 people have died. The country’s northern regions – Upper West, Upper East and Northern – have all been affected. Local media reported that as many as 100,000 people have been displaced.
 
Much of the flooding is a result of the overflowing White Volta river. Releases from the Bagre Dam in Burkina Faso over the last few weeks have increased levels of the river in northern Ghana. SONABEL, the power utility in Burkina Faso with responsibility for the Bagre Dam, started releases in late August after heavy rainfall in catchment areas had increased dam levels.
 
Ghana’s NADMO said that water in the dam rose by about 80 percent in the month of August 2018, as compared to a 50 percent rise in August 2017. In late August the Volta River Authority (VRA) warned communities along the White Volta river to prepare for flooding and take necessary precautions.
 
By early September the rate of water release had increased and the flood situation had worsened. Local media reported at least 7 dead and 100,000 displaced. Since then the death toll has increased significantly and flooding has caused widespread damage to farmland, roads and infrastructure including bridges, leaving many communities cut off.
Courtesy of floodlist.com