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Thousands Hit by #Floods in #Haut #Uélé and #Tshopo, #DRCongo

A building is almost entirely submerged in water in the Cité Kolongo neighborhood of Bangui in the Central African Republic. Photo: Itunu Kuku/NRC

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA) reports that flooding has affected thousands of people in the provinces of Haut-Uélé and Tshopo in the north of Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Meanwhile ongoing floods in neighbouring Central African Republic have destroyed 10,000 homes and affected almost 60,000 people, according to Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

According to UN OCHA, 18,000 people have been displaced by flooding in 45 villages in Isangi Territory, Tshopo Province. Isangi is located at the confluence of the Lomami and Congo rivers. Flooding has affected the territory since late October. The UN says no humanitarian relief has been provided to victims, who, according to local authorities, are in dire need for shelter, health and essential household items, as well as clean water and sanitation.

Meanwhile more than 10,600 people in Dungu and Niangara in Haut-Uélé Province are also in dire need of humanitarian support. Recent flooding in the two territories has destroyed shelters, health facilities and schools. Crops have also been damaged. Niangara is situated directly on the Uele river. Dungu is located at the confluence of the Dungu and Kibali Rivers where they join to form the Uele River.

Around 40,000 people have been displaced by flooding along the Ubangi River in the northern provinces of Sud-Ubangi and Nord-Ubangi. Flooding began in October after a period of heavy rain caused the Ubangi River to break its banks.

In neighbouring Central African Republic, ongoing floods that also began in late October have destroyed more than 10,000 homes and has impacted at least 57,000 people, according to the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

Country Director for the NRC, David Manan, said “Thousands of homes have been destroyed, and this disaster is affecting many people who were already struggling to make ends meet. The flooding is so severe in some parts of the capital Bangui that the only way to get around is by canoe.”

The government has declared a natural catastrophe and is appealing for national and international solidarity to support its emergency response efforts.

“People are currently living in overcrowded displacement sites as they seek protection from the rain. There is an urgent need for clean drinking water, mosquito nets and materials to set up temporary shelters to ensure people are kept healthy and safe,” said Manan.

“Stagnant water left by floods are breeding grounds for mosquitoes. We fear there could be a rise in the number of people affected by malaria and an outbreak of waterborne diseases like cholera if emergency assistance isn’t received in time,” he added.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/tp3l62x

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Worst #Flooding in 7 Years in #Borno and #Adamawa, #Nigeria Says #UN

Flooding in Rann, Borno State, Nigeria. Credit: GISCOR

Flooding has once again hit areas of northeast Nigeria, severely affecting thousands of people in Borno State. Meanwhile the flood situation in neighbouring Adamawa state continues, with almost 20,000 people displaced.

The UN says the floods in Borno and Adamawa state are the worst in seven years. About 300,000 people have been affected so far this year, which is five times more than expected.

According to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA), flooding in the town of Rann, Borno State, has affected around 40,000 people, leaving them with little or no access to food or services. Many of those affected are internally displaced people (IDPs) living in refugee camps.

Flooding began on 07 November, 2019, after the River Kaalia broke its banks in neighbouring Cameroon. Parts of Far North Region in Cameroon were hit by flooding in late October.

UN OCHA reports that flooding has damaged an estimated 4,000 hectares of farmland, “destroying crops that are the main source of food for internally displaced persons (IDPs) staying in Rann, a remote town in an area where violent attacks from non-State armed groups are frequent and access is difficult for humanitarian assistance due to the high insecurity and poor road conditions.”

“Stranded populations are running short of food and those who can afford it are paying high sums to be transported to the other areas, also putting their life at risk while crossing the river or travelling to safety. More than 300 people from Rann have managed to reach Ngala, a town some 40 km away, according to the International Organization for Migration. They had managed to leave Rann before the road became impassable,” the UN added.

Humanitarian partners are mobilizing resources to reach the stranded population via the UN Humanitarian Air Services until access is secured for small boats. Providing food is the main priority, along with water, shelters and emergency health services.

In neighbouring Adamawa State, more than 100,000 people are also affected by severe flooding across seven Local Government Areas since 27 October, following torrential rainfall and overflow of water from the Niger and Benue rivers. Around 19,000 people have been displaced from their homes.

The UN and humanitarian partners are scaling up assistance in Adamawa State as well and have already provided reproductive health kits to more than 56,000 people; non-food items to 400 families; and farming items to 4,000 families in areas that were not reached by Government assistance.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/wx47wzp

Thousands Displaced by #Flooding Along the #UbangiRiver in DR #Congo

Flood damage in Bangui Central African Republic, late October 2019. Photo: Equipe Nationale de Réponse aux Catastrophe de la CRCA

Around 40,000 people have been displaced by flooding along the Ubangi River in northern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Flooding began in October after a period of heavy rain caused the Ubangi River to break its banks in parts of Sud-Ubangi and Nord-Ubangi provinces in DRC. Thousands of people were also displaced in neighbouring areas of Central Africa Republic during this time.

In DRC the worst hit area is the town of Zongo in Sud-Ubangi province, situated on the south bank of the Ubangi River, across from Bangui in the Central African Republic. Libenge in Sud-Ubangi province has also been badly affected.

At least 1 person is thought to have died in the floods. In Sud-Ubangi province 14,200 houses have been damaged, along with 12 schools, 21 bridges, 48 public buildings and wide areas of crops, according to local media. Around 9,000 people have been displaced by the floods in neighbouring North-Ubangi province.

Heavy rain caused flash floods in Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in early October this year, leaving at least 6 people dead and around 30 houses destroyed. Further heavy rain and floods hit the city during mid-October.

Courtesy of floodlist.com/

https://tinyurl.com/yxx2whv3

Deadly #Floods in #Iran’s Northern Provinces

Floods in Golestan, Iran, November 2019. Photo: IRCS

At least 2 people have died in floods in Iran over the last few days. One person is still missing.

Heavy rain over the last few days has affected northern areas of the country, with flooding reported in the provinces of Golestan, Mazanderan, Semnan, North Khorasan, South Khorasan and Razavi Khorasan.

Roads have been cut and schools closed. Flooding has caused severe damage to farmland. Water supply has been interrupted in some flood-hit areas.

Radio Farda, quoting Iran Red Crescent Society (IRCS) sources, reported that 2 people died as a result of flooding in Torbat Jam in Razavi Khorasan Province. One person is reportedly missing in Mazanderan Province.

Courtesy of floodlist.com/

https://tinyurl.com/y573yux7

100,000 Affected by #Floods in #Kenya Says #UN

Floods have blocked roads in floods Tana River County, Kenya, October 2019. Photo: Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS)

Flooding across Kenya in the month of October has left at least 29 people dead and affected more than 101,000, according to the UN.

In a report of 30 October, 2019, the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said heavy rain since the start of the short rains season in early October has led to riverine and flash floods, rock falls, mudslides and landslides.

More than 101,000 people have been affected, mainly in the north-eastern, central, and coastal regions, according to the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS). Wajir County has been particularly hard-hit, with at least 43,000 people affected. Other affected counties include Marsabit, Mandera, Turkana, Elgeyo Marakwet, Kitui, Meru, Kajiado, Kwale, Nandi, Mombasa, Murang’a and Busia.

The KRCS has confirmed that at least 14,000 people have been displaced from their homes in low-lying areas where rivers have burst their banks.

At least 29 flood-related deaths have been reported and the death toll and number of people displaced is expected to rise in the days ahead as further information is received and verified from affected areas.

Nearly 400 hectares of farmland has been damaged and 21,710 livestock washed away, according to the KRCS, severely impacting livelihoods, including in areas already facing challenges due to drought.

Furthermore flooding has damaged or destroyed key infrastructure, including roads, bridges, schools and health facilities.

The UN report said: “At least 52 schools are inaccessible in Mandera and Wajir counties and some 14 health facilities cannot be reached in Mandera, Wajir and Marsabit. Many parts of Mombasa County have reported power outages caused by fallen electricity pylons or water-soaked transformers. Two bridges, including one linking Diani and Lungalunga at Kinondoni and the main bridge linking Tanzania and Kenya at Mihogoni trading centre, have been badly damaged. In Lodwar town and surrounding areas in Turkana County, nine out of 12 water boreholes were destroyed, impacting about 70,000 people.”

The rains -driven by the strong positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD)- are expected to continue in the days and weeks ahead, with most parts of the country likely to experience above average rainfall until early December 2019, according to the Kenyan Meteorological Department.

Courtesy of floodlist.com/

https://tinyurl.com/y2ztm2qz

More Deadly #Floods Hit #Tanga Region, #Tanzania

Floods in Handeni district, Tanga Region, Tanzania, have damaged bridges and roads, causing severe traffic disruption, October 2019. Photo: Tanga Regional Office

Over 20 people reportedly died after floods in Morogoro and Tanga regions from 12 October, 2019. By 17 October media reported that this figure had increased to 29 following a further 18 deaths in Tanga region after more heavy rain.

On 26 October at least 10 people died when a vehicle was swept away by a flooded river in the Sindeni area of Handeni district, Tanga Region, according to Tanzania’s Daily News .

Further flood-related fatalities in Handeni were reported on 27 October. Rain and flooding in the district have damaged houses and farmland. Several roads and bridges have been damaged or destroyed, causing severe traffic disruption in the district.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/y47bk8cn

#Floods Hit #Lagos, #Nigeria. Situation Worsens in #Niger and #Adamawa States

Flooding has affected several states of Nigeria over the last few days, in some cases worsening a situation that first began in late August this year.

Wide areas of the country’s north east were hit by flooding from late August this year. Central areas of the country were also affected around this time. Heavy rain that began on 17 August, 2019 caused flooding in Bosso and Chanchaga Local Government Areas of Niger State, leaving 3 dead and over 500 displaced.

Continued heavy rain in September increased levels of the Niger and Benue rivers, causing flooding in Cross River, Kogi and Taraba states, as well as Niger State where 11 deaths were reported.

Since then the death toll has increased to 18 in Niger state, according to media reports quoting Niger State Emergency Management Agency sources. The sources also said that almost 42,000 people have been displaced and 2,714 houses have been destroyed due to the disaster.

In Adamawa State, around 40 villages are under water after flooding from the Benue river, according to News Agency of Nigeria (NAN).

Quoting Adamawa State Emergency Management Agency, NAN said heavy rain from around 23 October caused the river to break its banks. There was also some speculation that the flooding was linked to the release of water from Lagdo Dam in Cameroon.

Farmland and houses along the Benue river have been destroyed. According to officials, flooding has affected communities in the local government areas of Fufore, Yola South, Demsa, Numan and Girei.

Rainstorms and flooding affected parts of Adamawa State from 01 August, 2019, leaving 7 people dead and dozens of houses damaged in the city of Yola, the Adamawa state capital.

In the south of the country flooding has affected parts of Lagos and Ogun states. Local media reported that 6 people died in floods in Lagos from around 21 October after a release of water from the Oyan Dam in Abeokuta city of the southwestern Ogun state. Houses were damaged and business and schools closed.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3k3em7g

120,000 Displaced After #Floods in 4 Regions in #Ethiopia

Featured image: File photo for illustration. Floods in Ethiopia, 2006. Photo:
Bob McCaffrey / Flickr under CC BY-SA 2.0

The UN reports that over 120,000 people have been displaced by flooding in Ethiopia this month.

In a report of 20 October, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA) said that during the month of October, “several flood incidences were reported in Afar, Oromia, SNNP and Somali regions displacing thousands and causing loss of property and livelihoods. Reportedly, some 202,202 people have been displaced across the country, the majority (127,524 people) in Somali region. ”

Heavy rainfall from early October caused rives to overflow in Somali region, including the Genale and Wabi Shabelle rivers and related tributaries.

Over 17,000 households were displaced in Shabelle zone of the Somali region. Latrines, schools buildings and health facilities have been damaged or destroyed. Meanwhile in Dollo Ado woreda (district), over 3,500 families have been displaced. Roads have been blocked and livestock and crops have been damaged or destroyed.

In Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNP) Region over 5,600 people were displaced by flooding in the woreda of Shashogo in Hadya zone from late September.

A landslide killed 22 people in Konta special woreda (Amaya town) on 13 October, as reported here. UN-OCHA said that floods and landslides were also reported in Melokoza woreda of Gofa zone and Zabageze woreda of Dawuro zone.

In Afar Region the Awash river broke its banks earlier this month, damaging or destroying 4,250 homes and affecting over 7,000 families. According to the UN, urgent shelter is reuired for thousands displaced.

Wide areas of crops , along with livestock and about 190 houses were damaged after floods in Bale zone, Oromia region, leaving 33,000 families in need of humanitarian assistance.

Schools, health facilities, farmland and cattle were all damaged after flooding in areas of Gambella region. UN-OCHA said that a total of 14,452 people were affected of which 11,128 individuals displaced.”

The added that “Access is becoming a challenge that will hinder the response. On 18 Oct ober 2019, the Shaygosh bridge between Gode and Jijiga collapsed. U nti l the area gets dry it will be very difficult to pass that section of the road. Hence, Gode and Kabridahar have been disconnected from Jijiga. Communit ies are also stranded by flood in Mustahil town, Mirdh is, Sedehbar, Fufug and Kobane in Mustahil and Afdub, Niiri , Kabhanle, Washaqo, and Shuubo in Kelafo woreda . Boat or helicopter are currently the only options to access those areas.”

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2f95nfg

Hundreds #Homeless After #Floods in Eastern and Western Regions, #Uganda

Homes were destroyed after floods in Eastern Region of Uganda, October 2019. Photo: Uganda Red Cross

More flooding has affected the Eastern Region of Uganda, leaving hundreds homeless. This is the third spate of flooding and rain-related disasters since June this year.

Heavy rain in Western Region last week destroyed homes and left at least 3 people dead in Kasese district.

Flooding in Eastern Region began around 18 October after a period of heavy rain. The situation was worsened by the overflowing Manafwa river.

According to the Uganda Red Cross, homes have been damaged and some completely destroyed affecting around 650 households in the district of Butaleja and around 300 households in Bulambuli. The districts of Bududa and Sironko have also been affected.

Irene Nakasiita, Spokesperson for Uganda Red Cross said flooding has left “roads cut off, bridges submerged, some washed away, over 100 houses collapsed, crops and other sources of livelihood destroyed.”

Deadly flooding and landslides hit Bulambuli district in August 2019. Earlier in the year at least 5 people died after heavy rain triggered landslides in Eastern Region in June.

Meanwhile in the country’s Western Region, local media reported that 3 people died after heavy rain in the district of Kasese on 13 October, 2019. Homes were destroyed leaving many families to take shelter in a church.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/y62qx2s5

Thousands Affected by #Floods in #Diffa Region, #Niger

Flooding began in early October 2019 in the Diffa Region of Niger. Photo: UNOCHA

Media in Niger, quoting officials from the Diffa Region, said the Komadougou river in Niger broke its banks in early October, forcing 23,000 people to flee their homes.

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) in Niger warned on 18 October that levels of the Komadougou in Diffa were more than 60cm above alert stage.

Across the region crops, farmland and homes have suffered damage. Some villages on the outskirts of the city of Diffa have been completely submerged.

Flooding was seen in Niger as early as June this year, but worsened from September, severely affecting communities in the regions of Maradi, Zinder and Agadez, as well as Dosso and the capital Niamey.

In a statement of 10 September, government authorities said that that the ongoing floods had resulted in 57 deaths and affected 132,528 people.

By late September the situation had worsened further. UNOCHA reported (pdf) in late September that 16,375 houses had been destroyed and 211,000 people affected, in particular in the 3 regions of Zinder (80,534 people affected), Maradi (28,847) and Agadez (31,222).

UNOCHA said the worsening situation in September was mainly because of the heavy rains recorded in the Niger basin and the overloading of the dams containing waters in Burkina Faso and Mali.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/yyqujq7o