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#Snowfall at #RilaMountain, #Bulgaria

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#July Snow In #Poland Took Everyone By Surprise!

Tatras mountains

Author: JAKUB ORZECHOWSKI / SE

Snow in July – this information surprised everyone. We remember the situations when it fell in April or even in May, but not during the holidays. June suggested that we could deal with a truly hot summer. In many cities in Poland, temperatures reached even 35 degrees Celsius, and the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management every year issued new warnings about the threat of heat. The situation changed by 180 degrees at the turn of June and July. For some time, we’ve been dealing mainly with cooling down. Nobody, however, expected that snow would fall in Poland.

July in the mountains is not pleasant for tourists. Those who decided to spend their holidays there are dealing with low temperatures, gusty winds and really poor visibility. What’s more, on the highest peaks of the Tatras lies fresh snow! According to the weather forecasters, the temperature on Kasprowy Wierch dropped below zero (-0.2 degrees). The Tatra Volunteer Ambulance Service warned everyone not to go to the mountains without proper equipment.

Courtesy of eska.pl

https://tinyurl.com/y66gxfht

#July #Record #Cold Strikes North Of #Hungary

Record Cold Alert

The National Meteorological Office informed that in the village of Zabar located in the north of Hungary the lowest temperature was recorded for July 10 in history. Thermometers showed only 3.5 degrees Celsius. So far, the lowest result for July 10 in Hungary was the one recorded in 2000 in the village of Gagyvendegi. Then the indicators on thermometers showed 4.3 degrees Celsius.

#Snow surprise on the last day of June in #Rize, #Turkey

Image result for snow alert

The snowfall on the Kaçkar Mountains in Çamlıhemşin district on the last day of June surprised everyone. With the falling snow, the summit of the mountain turned white. 40 climbers set out at 06.00 am to climb to the summit of the Kaçkar Mountains and had to return to Avusor Plateau because of snowfall.

Ercan Kesti, who returned from the group due to heavy snowfall while climbing Kaçkarlar, said, “We tried to climb Kaçkarlar but there is an incredible snowfall. We decided to return from Avusor Plateau. We return to our homes in a healthy way.

Courtesy of tv100.com

https://tinyurl.com/y6hxvaur

 

Major #Greenland #Glacier Is Growing

Major Greenland Glacier Is Growing

Jakobshavn Glacier in western Greenland is notorious for being the world’s fastest-moving glacier. It is also one of the most active, discharging a tremendous amount of ice from the Greenland Ice Sheet into Ilulissat Icefjord and adjacent Disko Bay—with implications for sea level rise. The image above, acquired on June 6, 2019, by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8, shows a natural-color view of the glacier.

Jakobshavn has spent decades in retreat—that is, until scientists observed an unexpected advance between 2016 and 2017. In addition to growing toward the ocean, the glacier was found to be slowing and thickening. New data collected in March 2019 confirm that the glacier has grown for the third year in a row, and scientists attribute the change to cool ocean waters.

“The third straight year of thickening of Greenland’s biggest glacier supports our conclusion that the ocean is the culprit,” said Josh Willis, an ocean scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and principal investigator of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission.


The maps above show how the glacier’s height changed between March 2016 and 2017 (top); March 2017 and 2018 (middle); and March 2018 and 2019 (bottom). The elevation data come from a radar altimeter that has been flown on research airplanes each spring as part of OMG. Blue areas represent where the glacier’s height has increased, in some areas by as much as 30 meters per year.

The change is particularly striking at the glacier’s front (solid blue area on the left) between 2016 and 2017. That’s when the glacier advanced the most, replacing open water and sea ice with towering glacial ice. The glacier has not advanced as much since then, but it continues to slow and thicken.

Willis compared the glacier’s behavior to silly putty. “Pull it from one end and it stretches and gets thinner, or squash it together and it gets thicker,” he said. The latter scenario is what is happening now as the glacier slows down: Notice that by the third year, thickening is occurring across an increasingly wide area.

Willis and colleagues think the glacier is reacting to a shift in a climate pattern called the North Atlantic Oscillation, which has brought cold water northward along Greenland’s west coast. Measurements of the temperatures collected by the OMG team show that the cold water has persisted.

“Even three years after the cold water arrived, the glacier is still reacting,” Willis said. “I’m really excited to go back this August and measure the temperature again. Is it still cold? Or has it warmed back up?”

NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey, and data courtesy of Josh Willis/NASA JPL and the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) Program. Story by Kathryn Hansen.

Courtesy of earthobservatory.nasa.gov

https://tinyurl.com/y6f6bb8g

Very Rare #June #Snowfall In Kashmir

As the plains of Northern India reeled under the much-documented heat this week, the higher elevations of Kashmir were receiving super-rare June snow, with the lower regions inundated with heavy rains.

The unexpected June snowfall was received at the Sonamarg resort in central Kashmir, over its adjoining higher reaches and also in Drass, Kargil, Zanskar, towns in the Ladakh division, and in Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Sikkim.

The nation’s weather department deemed the snowfall a “rare” meteorological event.

“I have never witnessed snow in summer. For me it was a miracle of watching snow in June when the heat wave is continuing in northern parts of the India,’’ said Rajesh Kumar, a tourist from Rajasthan.

Jalal Jeelani, an environmentalist and renowned film maker on environmental issues said this was no cause for celebration: “For us it is a warning and sign of the global warming. The snowfall is dangerous to our horticulture and agriculture sector. We should ponder why this is happening in our region.’’

That’s right, snowfall is now a sign of global warming, too.

There’s no illogic off limits.

And while higher elevations received rare (?warm?) snow, plains of the Valley saw heavy rainfall overnight which triggered flash floods in several areas and also sharply increased the level of water bodies.

The catchments of south and north Kashmir received more than 2 inches (50 mm) of rain in the past 24 hours, according to the area’s Irrigation and Flood Control department.

“50 mm plus rainfall in a catchment results in a flood-like situation in the tributary. The people residing along the tributaries in south and north Kashmir are advised to remain alert and not go too close to these tributaries,” the department warned.

The sun is continuing it’s relative shutdown, as it enters it’s next Grand Solar Minimum cycle:

The cold times are returning.

Prepare.

Courtesy of electroverse.net

https://tinyurl.com/y4upn3xk