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Heavy #Rain Triggers Deadly #Landslides in #Cibitoke Province, #Burundi

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At least 26 people have died and more are missing after heavy rain triggered landslides Cibitoke province, northwestern Burundi.

Burundi’s Ministry of Public Safety and Disaster Management said in a statement on 05 December that the landslide occurred in Nyempundu, Gikomero and Rukombe in Nyamakarabo zone, Mugina commune in Cibitoke province. Provisional assessments say that 26 people have died, 07 were injured and 10 people are still missing. Some media reports say the death toll has since climbed to 38. Search operations are still in progress. The Ministry said that houses, crops and livestock have also been damaged.

Heavy rain fell between 04 and 05 December, 2019. Images show that complete hillsides have fallen away in several locations. The area is still extremely unstable and the governor of Cibitoke, Joseph Iteriteka, urged people living in affected locations to evacuate their homes until further notice.

Heavy rain has also affected other areas of the country. News agency Agence Burundaise de Presse (ABP) reported flooding in Muramvya province, where the Mubarazi River has broken its banks, inundating roads and crops.

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/uak8uvl

100,000 Affected by #Floods in #Kenya Says #UN

Floods have blocked roads in floods Tana River County, Kenya, October 2019. Photo: Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS)

Flooding across Kenya in the month of October has left at least 29 people dead and affected more than 101,000, according to the UN.

In a report of 30 October, 2019, the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said heavy rain since the start of the short rains season in early October has led to riverine and flash floods, rock falls, mudslides and landslides.

More than 101,000 people have been affected, mainly in the north-eastern, central, and coastal regions, according to the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS). Wajir County has been particularly hard-hit, with at least 43,000 people affected. Other affected counties include Marsabit, Mandera, Turkana, Elgeyo Marakwet, Kitui, Meru, Kajiado, Kwale, Nandi, Mombasa, Murang’a and Busia.

The KRCS has confirmed that at least 14,000 people have been displaced from their homes in low-lying areas where rivers have burst their banks.

At least 29 flood-related deaths have been reported and the death toll and number of people displaced is expected to rise in the days ahead as further information is received and verified from affected areas.

Nearly 400 hectares of farmland has been damaged and 21,710 livestock washed away, according to the KRCS, severely impacting livelihoods, including in areas already facing challenges due to drought.

Furthermore flooding has damaged or destroyed key infrastructure, including roads, bridges, schools and health facilities.

The UN report said: “At least 52 schools are inaccessible in Mandera and Wajir counties and some 14 health facilities cannot be reached in Mandera, Wajir and Marsabit. Many parts of Mombasa County have reported power outages caused by fallen electricity pylons or water-soaked transformers. Two bridges, including one linking Diani and Lungalunga at Kinondoni and the main bridge linking Tanzania and Kenya at Mihogoni trading centre, have been badly damaged. In Lodwar town and surrounding areas in Turkana County, nine out of 12 water boreholes were destroyed, impacting about 70,000 people.”

The rains -driven by the strong positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD)- are expected to continue in the days and weeks ahead, with most parts of the country likely to experience above average rainfall until early December 2019, according to the Kenyan Meteorological Department.

Courtesy of floodlist.com/

https://tinyurl.com/y2ztm2qz

120,000 Displaced After #Floods in 4 Regions in #Ethiopia

Featured image: File photo for illustration. Floods in Ethiopia, 2006. Photo:
Bob McCaffrey / Flickr under CC BY-SA 2.0

The UN reports that over 120,000 people have been displaced by flooding in Ethiopia this month.

In a report of 20 October, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA) said that during the month of October, “several flood incidences were reported in Afar, Oromia, SNNP and Somali regions displacing thousands and causing loss of property and livelihoods. Reportedly, some 202,202 people have been displaced across the country, the majority (127,524 people) in Somali region. ”

Heavy rainfall from early October caused rives to overflow in Somali region, including the Genale and Wabi Shabelle rivers and related tributaries.

Over 17,000 households were displaced in Shabelle zone of the Somali region. Latrines, schools buildings and health facilities have been damaged or destroyed. Meanwhile in Dollo Ado woreda (district), over 3,500 families have been displaced. Roads have been blocked and livestock and crops have been damaged or destroyed.

In Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNP) Region over 5,600 people were displaced by flooding in the woreda of Shashogo in Hadya zone from late September.

A landslide killed 22 people in Konta special woreda (Amaya town) on 13 October, as reported here. UN-OCHA said that floods and landslides were also reported in Melokoza woreda of Gofa zone and Zabageze woreda of Dawuro zone.

In Afar Region the Awash river broke its banks earlier this month, damaging or destroying 4,250 homes and affecting over 7,000 families. According to the UN, urgent shelter is reuired for thousands displaced.

Wide areas of crops , along with livestock and about 190 houses were damaged after floods in Bale zone, Oromia region, leaving 33,000 families in need of humanitarian assistance.

Schools, health facilities, farmland and cattle were all damaged after flooding in areas of Gambella region. UN-OCHA said that a total of 14,452 people were affected of which 11,128 individuals displaced.”

The added that “Access is becoming a challenge that will hinder the response. On 18 Oct ober 2019, the Shaygosh bridge between Gode and Jijiga collapsed. U nti l the area gets dry it will be very difficult to pass that section of the road. Hence, Gode and Kabridahar have been disconnected from Jijiga. Communit ies are also stranded by flood in Mustahil town, Mirdh is, Sedehbar, Fufug and Kobane in Mustahil and Afdub, Niiri , Kabhanle, Washaqo, and Shuubo in Kelafo woreda . Boat or helicopter are currently the only options to access those areas.”

Courtesy of floodlist.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2f95nfg

#Drought and commercial #cattle #farming exposes tens of thousands to devastating #hunger in #Angola

Drought Emergency Alert_2

The end of cattle’s paradise: How diversion of land for ranches eroded food security in the Gambos calls on the Angolan government to immediately provide emergency food assistance to the communities facing hunger, declare a moratorium on land grants, and appoint a commission of inquiry to investigate how 46 commercial farms ended up with two-thirds of the best grazing land in Tunda dos Gambos and Vale de Chimbolela since the end of civil war in 2002.

“The current drought in Angola has exposed the devastating impact of commercial cattle farming on communities in Gambos. Traditional cattle farmers have lost their best grazing land and now watch helplessly as their children and families go to bed on empty stomachs,” said Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Regional Director for Southern Africa.

“The government has failed to protect the rights of these communities – in particular, their right to food. They have been left to scratch a living from infertile, unproductive land – and now as the drought tightens its grip – they have simply been left with nothing to eat.”

The report shows that hunger and starvation are rife among the Vanyaneke and Ovaherero people living in the Gambos. Colloquially this region is known as Angola’s “milk region” because cattle rearing and milk production have been central to the economy and way of life of people here.

While the semi-arid Gambos region is prone to cyclical droughts, Amnesty International found that traditional cattle breeders and their families are struggling to produce food for themselves after communal grazing land, which once mitigated against the impact of drought, was allocated by the government to commercial cattle farmers.

As a result, pastoralists are left with insufficient and unproductive land for growing food and grazing their cattle. Milk, cheese, yoghurt and meat production is the main source of their livelihoods.

Families told Amnesty International researchers that the situation is now so dire that they had resorted to eating wild leaves. Many said they suffer with sickness and diarrhea and have also developed skin conditions such as scabies due to water scarcity and poor hygienic conditions.

One pastoralist told Amnesty International that: “There is not enough milk anymore. So, we the grown-ups have given up drinking milk so that the children can still have some. As you can see, we do not look healthy and strong as we used to be. We are skinny and weak.”

Another pastoralist said that: “These days many people are becoming very sick because of hunger. Sometimes we go to Chiange to sell firewood so that we can buy some food. There is someone who died here because of hunger.”

According to the government, there are now 46 commercial livestock farms occupying 2,629km2 of the most fertile land, leaving only 1,299km2 of grazing land for the traditional cattle breeders. This translates to 67% of the land occupied by commercial farmers, leaving pastoralists with only 33% of the land.

Amnesty International found that the land, used for centuries as communal grazing land by pastoralists from southern Angola’s Cunene, Huila, and Namibe provinces, was taken away from communities without due process.

Despite this, the government has allowed commercial livestock farmers to occupy the Tunda dos Gambos and Vale de Chimbolela without giving local communities any form of compensation, clearly violating the country’s law.

Courtesy of amnesty.org

https://tinyurl.com/y6ayf6bk

Hundreds of #cattle dead due to #storm in #Almeria, #Spain

Livestock Alert

The sub-delegate of the Government in Almeria, Manuel de la Fuente , has toured on Tuesday the municipalities of the Almanzora region most affected by the floods and has seen ‘in situ’, accompanied by the mayors, the “huge damage caused by torrential rains “.

As the agency has indicated in a note, it is the third visit made by De la Fuente to the areas most affected by the passage of DANA, after those already made on Friday, first to Níjar and then to Huércal-Overa and Pulpí.

The damage check has started early in the morning in Cantoria, where about 110 liters per square meter of water fell in just two hours. In the La Hojilla ravine, which joins Cantoria with the district of La Hoya, the water reached about two meters high and caused the breakage of the road and the concrete chains of the bridge.

Likewise, the passage to the hamlet of El Faz , where some 200 neighbors live , remains cut . The water pipe has also damaged the crossing bridge over the Almanzora River, between the towns of Cantoria and Almanzora. In this place, the water exceeded four meters high in the riverbed and rose above two meters on the road. The City Council, chaired by Purificación Sánchez, is still estimating the damages suffered.

In Arboleas , the most important destruction caused by the flood was the rupture of the potable water supply pipes to the neighborhoods of El Rincón, La Cinta and Tahullas, where around 600 neighbors reside, a problem that, today, It has already been resolved, as highlighted by the mayor, Cristóbal García. The rain has also caused numerous landslides on municipal roads to access slums.

The next municipality has been Armuña del Almanzora . There, the sub-delegate has traveled with his mayor, José Berruezo, part of the rural roads flooded by the rain, which has also caused serious damage to different ramblas and in the water supply network of the municipality. This noon, city hall machinery worked piece by piece to repair the supply as soon as possible.

Courtesy of canalsur.es

https://tinyurl.com/y5lkqufg

The worst #drought in 90 years hits the #Khomas region in #Namibia

Drought Emergency Alert_2

THE Khomas region is experiencing its worst drought in 90 years, according to official rainfall figures released by the Namibia Meteorological Service this week.

The region received less than a third of its normal quantity of rainfall over the past rainy season from October last year to the end of April this year. The bulk of the north-central regions of the country received about a third of their normal seasonal rainfall, and most of the Erongo, Otjozondjupa and Omaheke regions recorded less than 40% of their normal rainfall totals, figures released by the weather service show.

The Meteorological Service also reported that while the eastern parts of the Zambezi region received between 60% and 80% of their normal seasonal rainfall totals during the 2018/19 rainy season, the situation was worse in the western parts of the region, which has ended up experiencing its worst drought in the last 59 years.

At the weather service’s head office in Windhoek, 106,7 millimetres of rain was measured during the past rainy season – the lowest annual figure since 1929/30, when a seasonal total of 97 mm was recorded at the same spot.

The past rainy season has also been drier in Windhoek than during the 1981/82 season, when a total of 126,2 mm of rain was recorded at the Windhoek Met Office during a severe drought that had Namibia in its grips.

Windhoek’s total rainfall during a normal rainy season is around 355 mm.

The end-of-season rainfall bulletin also shows that the situation is even more serious at Witvlei in the Omaheke region, where only 67 mm of rain was recorded from October to April. This is 79% below the normal seasonal total of 317,7 mm.

At Steinhausen, north-west of Gobabis, a near-normal rainfall total of 317,5 mm was recorded from October to April, though – only 8% below the normal seasonal total of 343,7 mm.

At Rundu, 334 mm of rain was recorded from October 2018 to the end of April 2019 – 41% below the town’s normal seasonal rainfall total of 568,6 mm.

The rainfall total of 168,7 mm recorded at Ondangwa during the past rainy season is 63% below the town’s normal seasonal total of 450,8 mm. At Grootfontein, the seasonal total came to 230,2 mm at the end of April, which is 57% below the town’s normal figure of 540,3 mm.

In the southern part of the Kunene region, 105,6 mm of rain was recorded at Khorixas during the past rainy season. That is 52% below its normal seasonal total of 220,4 mm.

The seasonal total of 31 mm measured at Gochas is 82% lower than the normal total rainfall of 176,4 mm in that part of in the Hardap region during an average rainy season.

At Keetmanshoop, 36,2 mm of rain was measured during the past rainy season – 76% below the
//Kharas town’s normal seasonal total of 151 mm.

The failed rainy season is also reflected in the levels of the main dams supplying water to Windhoek. On Monday, the Von Bach and Swakoppoort dams were storing a combined 29 million cubic metres of water – compared to about 55 million cubic metres a year ago, and more than 62 million cubic metres at the same stage in 2017.

According to the City of Windhoek, city residents again failed to meet water saving targets over the past week. While the city has set a weekly water consumption target of no more than 465 000 cubic metres, actual consumption recorded over the past week was 497 332 cubic metres of water.

Water restrictions in the city are set to be tightened from the start of July.

Courtesy of namibian.com.na

https://tinyurl.com/y29rdcfn

Thousands of #cattle dead due to #drought in #Maule, #Chile

Livestock Alert

Even worse in 60 years, it is wreaking havoc in the central zone of Chile, the losses in the agricultural sector are considerable, spring and summer could further exacerbate this situation.

According to estimates released by El Mercurio, some 10,000 animals have died among the regions of Coquimbo al Maule. Among these, Valparaíso would be the most affected, as El Mercurio pointed out to the Agriculture seremi, Humberto Lepe, 30% of the dead animals are cattle and 70% goats and sheep.

From the Ministry of Agriculture recognize that the Valparaíso Region is the most affected. “ We have 2,500 very complicated farmers and approximately 50 thousand affected animals”

In the Coquimbo Region as long as they move the cattle to the San Juan Argentina mountain range, to look for some food, while in the O’Higgins Region the farmers will have only one third of the usual water flow.

The situation is serious since in the Coquimbo Region the loss of livestock mass exceeds 50%, while in the Valparaíso Region the problem is affecting even bees. The hives are dying because there are no flowers anymore.

Courtesy of radioagricultura.cl

https://tinyurl.com/yybksfga

Hundreds of #animals dead from #storms in #Spain

animal storms

Several heads of cattle die as a result of lightning in Ávila. / ASAJA

From cows to small birds. The storms of the past few days have claimed the lives of hundreds of animals in Spain, as witnessed by the videos that these days collapse social networks.

The strong storms that fell during the afternoon last Monday left hard images in many municipalities of the Spanish geography. Social networks were filled in a matter of minutes of photographs and videos in which you could see the great ice balls left by hailstorm in different parts of the country, many of them destroying crops and wildlife. In some cases, the size of the balls was similar to that of golf balls, a lethal weapon capable of killing animals of all kinds.

The following video is really bleak. It is recorded in the Jiennense town of La Puerta de Segura and shows how a devastating hail storm ended up with hundreds of birds in the place . As the person recording the video progresses, dozens of birds per meter can be seen killed by the impacts of hail.

On the other hand, livestock deaths due to lightning strikes and stream overflows must also be regretted. This is the case, for example, of Ávila, where ASAJA has requested the support of all administrations to deal with the large damages that it now has to face after the storms.

In this province, ranchers from towns such as Villafranca de la Sierra or Santa María de los Caballeros have seen some of their cattle die as a result of lightning strikes on their farms.

Courtesy of revistajaraysedal.es

https://tinyurl.com/y62g4hk4

Thousands of #cattle dead due to #flooding in #Mumbai, #India

Livestock Alert

Mumbai could face milk shortages during the upcoming festival season as many farmers in the state have lost cattle in the floods and fodder is either soaked or rotting.

Courtesy of mumbaimirror.indiatimes.com

https://tinyurl.com/yywyucj6

44 #cattle found dead in a #wildlife reserve in #Nepal

Livestock Alert

Last week, 44 cattle died in Sunsari, something conservationists and veterinarians say could pose immediate danger to park animals and local residents.

Following the discovery of dozens of dead cattle in the buffer zone area of Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve, conservation officials are concerned that the mysterious disease could spread to the reserve’s wildlife and threaten their lives.

The National Park and Wildlife Conservation Department, the government body that manages protected areas and wildlife, dispatched a two-member team to the reserve on Sunday to study and prepare a report. The place where the cattle were found dead is less than 700 meters from the reserve’s forestland.

Technicians at the Livestock Disease Research Laboratory in Biratnagar who conducted a test on the dead cattle said they had detected anthrax. Officials said at least 44 cows and oxen were found dead in Srilankatapu on Aug. 8, bleeding from their nose, eyes, ears, mouth and anus.

“The lab test confirmed that the cattle died due to soil-borne anthrax bacteria. The disease is transmissible in nature through air, water and soil,” said Dr. Manoj Kumar Mahato, a veterinarian at the Inaruwa-based Veterinary Hospital and Livestock Service Center.

However, officials at the national park department refused to declare that the disease that killed the cattle was anthrax.

“After the laboratory reports said anthrax was detected, we have immediately dispatched a team on the ground,” said Bishnu Prasad Shrestha, a spokesperson with the department. The team is expected to take notes from local residents, veterinarians and other park officials during its investigation.

Courtesy of the-japan-news.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2xtqat5