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#NASA tracking THREE #asteroids headed this way, two spotted just 2 days ago

NASA tracking THREE asteroids headed this way, two spotted just 2 days ago

© Pixabay / Thomas Breher

NASA is currently tracking three near-Earth objects (NEOs) due to fly past the Earth on November 20. Worryingly, two of the three were only spotted this past weekend, once again raising tensions over planetary defense.

The first of Wednesday’s cosmic flybys and the largest, measuring 157.5ft to 360.8ft (48 to 110 meters) across, will be asteroid 2019 UK6, which will speed past at approximately 6.20am GMT (1.20am EDT). It is 2019 UK6 we had most prior warning about, as it was first observed on October 24.

NEO 2019 UK6 is an Amor asteroid, which that goes around the Sun and the Earth, occasionally, but very rarely, crossing Earth’s path. Apollo asteroids, on the other hand, intersect with Earth’s orbit as the planet travels around the Sun.

The second of the Wednesday’s flybys will be 2019 WF, first spotted by NASA’s asteroid hunters just two days ago on November 17. Estimated to be about 24 meters wide, it will make its closest Earth approach at roughly twice the distance to the moon, so no danger of an extinction level event there anyway.

Last up will be 2019 WE, also spotted at the last second on November 17. This asteroid will sail past our planet at a distance of about 1.3 million kilometers away.

According to NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), all three will have what are dubbed “near-Earth approaches,” but thankfully none are believed to pose any threat.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/teovxz2

#Asteroid RISK! #NASA warns space rock twice the size of #EiffelTower is bearing down on #Earth

Aste-RISK! NASA warns space rock twice the size of Eiffel Tower is bearing down on Earth

Illustration: © urikyo33 from Pixabay

The seemingly never-ending stream of Earth-bound space rocks continues, as an Apollo-class asteroid measuring between 918ft and 2,034ft in diameter (280m-620m) is due to skim past our planet on November 21.

Affectionately dubbed ‘481394 (2006 SF6),’ the asteroid is traveling at a speed of roughly 17,780mph (27,360kph) and will make what NASA dubs a ‘close approach’ shortly after midnight (GMT) in mid-November at a distance of 2.6 million miles (4.2 million kilometers) away, or approximately eleven times as far away as the Moon.

The Apollo-class space rock is estimated to measure up to twice the size of the Eiffel Tower (or half the size of Ben Nevis for Brexiteers).

While the risk of impact is low, there is a small chance the Yarkovsky effect, in which sunlight can steer asteroids off their current trajectory, may send the asteroid even closer.

Apollo asteroids are Earth-crossing asteroids initially discovered by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth in the 1930s that constitute a little over 10,000 of NASA’s 19,000 known ‘near-Earth objects’ (NEOs), which orbit the Sun within 18,600,000 miles of our planet.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/y56uyhse

111-foot #asteroid screeching towards #Earth at over 22,000 miles per hour

111-foot asteroid screeching towards Earth at over 22,000 miles per hour

Earth is soon set for another close shave with a hurtling space rock as an 111-foot asteroid is poised to skim past our planet on its closest approach for 115 years.

First spotted by astronomers only earlier this week, the asteroid dubbed 2019 TA7 is set to fly by Earth at a speed of over 22,500 miles per hour at 6:53pm ET on Monday, data from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) reveals.

The new celestial visitor is estimated to measure up to 111 feet in diameter and is among a group of recently discovered asteroids that have been traveling close to Earth in recent days.

The flying rock orbits the Sun once every 240 days and passes by Earth about once a year. However, Monday’s approach will be our closest encounter with it in 115 years when it passes by at a distance of about 930,000 miles, more than 50 times closer to Earth than our nearest neighbor, Mercury.

Experts have repeatedly warned that Earth has no defense against an asteroid smashing into its surface. In fact the United Nations created World Asteroid Day in a bid to raise awareness about the possibility.

The UN is particularly worried about undetected asteroids, similar to 2019 TA7, as a major concern with hazardous space objects is that we are not good at detecting them and some of the most dangerous ones have caught us by surprise.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/y4z4gqbm

The #Brazilian #Drought Of 1877-1879 – This is what #NASA is hiding

The Great Drought , or drought in northeastern Brazil from 1877-79 , was the most devastating drought phenomenon of the history of Brazil , occurred in the Brazilian imperial period . The calamity is responsible for the deaths of between 400,000 and 500,000 people. Of a total of 800,000 people living in the affected area of the Northeast , around 120,000 migrated to the Amazon while 68,000 migrated to other parts of Brazil. The most affected region was the province of Ceará. Three years in a row without rain, without harvest, without planting, with loss of herds and with the escape of families, leaving uninhabited the interior. Both this drought event, as well as before and after, are associated with the El Niño phenomenon and its direct interference with the climate of this and other regions.

Courtesy of realclimatescience.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxbvmv7v

Empire State Building-sized #asteroid set to scream past #Earth at 10,400mph

Empire State Building-sized asteroid set to scream past Earth at 10,400mph

The asteroid will come 10 times closer to Earth than our nearest neighbor. © Pixabay

An asteroid larger than the Empire State Building (1,454 feet), and known as 2006 QQ23, will scream past the Earth at roughly 10,400 mph in the early hours of Saturday morning.

First spotted in 2006, hence the name, the 1,870ft-diameter juggernaut will make its closest approach to Earth on Saturday at 3:23 am EDT, according to NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS).

The space rock will come 10 times closer to Earth than Venus, our nearest neighbor, when it passes by at a distance of 0.049 astronomical units (4.6 million miles) while traveling at speeds of around 10,400 mph.

Any cosmic projectile with a minimum approach distance of less than 0.05 astronomical units and measuring over 460 feet in diameter is considered by NASA to be “potentially hazardous.”

The vast majority of small space objects that enter our atmosphere measure less than 30 feet in diameter and burn up on entry, but 2006 QQ23 is far larger than that.

We are currently aware of some 20,000 such Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and are discovering new ones at a rate of roughly 30 per week. Of these, we are currently aware of about 900 NEOs measuring more than 3,280 feet in diameter.

About six space objects around the size of Asteroid 2006 QQ23 pass by our planet each year, but thankfully all pose a statistically insignificant risk to life here on Earth.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/y6g263f9