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24,500 #birds killed due to #BirdFlu in #Liaoning province, #China

Bird Flu

China reported an outbreak of a highly pathogenic strain of H5N1 bird flu at a farm in northeastern Liaoning province, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Tuesday.

The case occurred on a farm with 24,500 birds but the ministry did not specify if they were chickens or other types of poultry.

The authorities have culled 25,472 bird following the outbreak.

Last week, Liaoning province found a strain of H7N9 bird flu at a zoo.

Courtesy of reuters.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxqmjdwp

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600+ #ducks and 66 #chickens killed due to #BirdFlu in #Cuttack, #India

Bird Flu

A team of veterinary doctors and experts culled more than 600 ducks and 66 chickens on Sunday following confirmation of bird flu (H5N1) in the city.

Courtesy of timesofindia.indiatimes.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3qno3vr

2,000+ birds killed due to bird flu in Munger, India

Bird Flu

Bird flu scare continues to persist in Bihar as 400 chickens were found dead at a poultry farm at a village in Bikram block in Patna district in the last 24 hours.

More than 2,000 birds, including chicken and ducks have been culled in a village at Munger after tests confirmed H5N1 virus.

Courtesy of timesofindia.indiatimes.com

https://tinyurl.com/y6u8vu8g

16,000 ducks killed due to bird flu in Biddinghuizen, Netherlands

Bird Flu
A reassortant H5N6 avian flu virus detected in three Asian nations over the past few weeks has been confirmed in an outbreak in the Netherlands.
 
In other developments, South Korea—one of the countries that has already reported outbreaks from the H5N6 reassortant this season—reported another at a duck farm. And Cambodia reported an H5N1 avian flu outbreak in poultry, its first in nearly a year.
 
The outbreak in the Netherlands was first reported on Dec 8, and government officials had said initial tests from the duck farm near the city of Dronten was likely a highly pathogenic strain. In a notification yesterday from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the country’s economic affairs ministry said the outbreak began on Dec 7 at a fattening-duck farm near the town of Biddinghuizen.
 
The virus killed 40 of 15,985 birds, and the surviving ducks were culled to curb the spread of the virus. Tests revealed the H5N6 subtype is a reassortment linked to H5N8 and not the Asian zoonotic H5N6.
 
Animal health authorities have established surveillance and protection zones around the farm. Screening at four farms in the 3-kilometer (km) surveillance zone was negative for H5N6.
 
A report from the country’s Wageningen Bioveterinary Research Institute, translated and posted by the infectious disease news blog Avian Flu Diary (AFD), said the farm was one of the first to be hit by H5N8 last season. The institute said initial tests suggest that it is not related to the zoonotic H5N6 strain. The virus’ H5 is related to the highly pathogenic H5N8 found in the Netherlands in 2016, and the N6 is related to low-pathogenic viruses previously found in wild birds in Europe.
 
The Netherlands is the fifth country to report the H5N6 reassortant, which is similar to a virus fist identified in Greece during last winter’s extensive H5N8 outbreaks that struck Europe and other parts of the world. The virus is a reassortant of highly pathogenic H5N8 and endemic Eurasian viruses.
 
In late November, South Korea reported its first outbreak involving the H5N6 reassortant, and the following day, Japan reported a detection in samples from a dead wild swan. A few days later, preliminary tests in Taiwan identified the same reassortant in a sample from a wild bird found dead in a national park.
 
In a related development, South Korea’s agriculture ministry today confirmed another H5N6 outbreak, this time at a commercial duck farm in the city of Yeongam in North Jeolla province, the country’s Yonhap News reported. The ministry said 76,000 ducks were slaughtered at five duck farms within a 3-km radius of the outbreak site to control the spread of the virus.
 
Officials said the virus is probably highly pathogenic, but more test results to further characterize it are expected.
 
Elsewhere, Cambodia’s agriculture ministry reported a highly pathogenic H5N1 outbreak at a local chicken farm in Kampong Chang province, according to a Dec 9 notice from the OIE.
 
The event began on Nov 22, killing nearly all of the 1,763 chickens at the location. The farm’s owner reported the sick and dead birds to provincial authorities on Nov 28. The surviving 24 birds were culled. So far the source of the virus isn’t known. Kampong Cham is in south central Cambodia.
 
The country’s previous H5N1 outbreak occurred in January.
Courtesy of cidrap.umn.edu

66,500 chickens killed due to bird flu in Inner Mongolia, China

China’s Inner Mongolia region has culled 66,500 chickens following an outbreak of bird flu that has affected 35,000 birds, the Ministry of Agriculture said on Tuesday.
 
The H5N1 strain of the virus was confirmed at a hen farm in Tongliao city, which has of 3 million people, and has killed 15,000 birds, the ministry said in a statement on its website.
 
The outbreak is now under control, the ministry said.
 
The last bird flu outbreak in March killed 134 birds at a duck farm in central Hubei province.
 
The most recent case is the first confirmed major bird flu outbreak among poultry after winter months and brings the total culled since October to more than 240,000 birds.
 
Additionally, the H7N9 strain of the virus has caused at least 281 deaths since October in China.
 
Live poultry markets were shut down in many provinces following human infections, forcing egg producers to keep their hens beyond their prime time, as demand also plunged amid public fears over bird flu.
 
Flocks are particularly vulnerable to avian flu during the winter months and outbreaks usually die down afterwards.
Courtesy of reuters.com
 

5,000 chickens dead due to bird flu in Dawei, Myanmar

About 5,000 chickens have died of H5N1 bird flu, also known as avian influenza at a farm in Dawei, southern Tanintharyi region as of Friday, official media reported Saturday.
 
Sales of eggs and chickens are strictly prohibited in the affected area and cleansing measures in the farming area are being taken.
 
Other regions and states are also being examined after the avian flu’s outbreak in Dawei.
 
As the avian flu is usually classified into three groups, type A, B and C, Type A outbreak in Myanmar’s Tanintharyi region is the virus type which can easily infect both humans and animals.
 
The first outbreak of A/H5N1 avian flu occurred in 2006 in Myanmar.
Courtesy of news.xinhuanet.com
 

25,000 birds dead due to bird flu in Kelantan, Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s northeastern state of Kelantan on Wednesday (Mar 15) declared a disaster to fight the outbreak of H5N1 avian flu after the virus spread to two more districts – Pasir Putih and Bachok.
 
The highly pathogenic bird flu virus was first detected on Mar 6 after a few free-range chickens died outside the state capital Kota Bharu.
 
Eighteen villages in Kota Bharu have been affected and almost 25,000 birds – mainly chickens, ducks and geese – have been culled since the infection was reported.
 
The Kelantan Agriculture and Veterinary Services Department declared the outbreak a state disaster and ordered all agencies and departments to control the outbreak. 
 
The Malaysian Health Ministry’s director general, Noor Hisham, said no human infection has been detected so far but that the ministry is nevertheless on the alert. He added that the virus has not spread to other states, and that the outbreak seems to be contained in Kelantan, which borders Thailand.
 
The public has been told to take precautions, such as reporting to the authorities if they come into contact with dead birds, and to take care of their personal hygiene.
 
The state’s veterinary department believes that the virus could have been spread though infected fighting cocks, like in the last outbreak which occurred in 2004. State authorities have asked the community to avoid cockfighting activities for now.
Courtesy of channelnewsasia.com

6,200 hens killed due to bird flu in Koshi, Nepal

Nepal has reported firmed an outbreak of severe H5N8 bird flu on a poultry farm in the Koshi region, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said on Monday, citing a report from the Nepalese authorities.
 
The virus killed 3,650 of the 6,200 hens exposed, with the remaining animals culled, the Paris-based OIE said.
 
Nepal had already reported last month an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu among backyard chickens and ducks.
Courtesy of reuters.com

MASSIVE deaths of chickens killed due to bird flu in Cao Bang, Vietnam

VIET NAM – Viet Nam reported outbreaks of avian flu H5N1 and H5N6 in northern Cao Bang province, the National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE) said on Monday.
 
Accordingly, in 34 households in Quoc Toan community, Cao Bang’s Tra Linh district and one household in Cao Bang City’s Song Bang ward, massive deaths of chicken with unknown reason were recorded, the local Tien Phong (Pioneer) newspaper reported.
 
Local animal health officials took samples and sent them to the NIHE for tests. The test results showed that dead poultry in Tra Linh district were positive with avian influenza H5N1 while those in Cao Bang City were positive with H5N6 strain.
 
Cao Bang’s authorities have culled a total of 4,015 chicken and 18 doves as well as sterilized poultry cages and surrounding environment in two virus-hit areas.
 
The province has over 330 km of shared border with China, where avian influenza H7N9 virus is detected.
Courtesy of thepoultrysite.com