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#TangkubanPerahuVolcano #eruption in #Indonesia (July 26, 2019)

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#RedAlert #MajorEruption – Major #AshClouds Drifting East And South From #UlawunVolcano In #PapuaNewGuinea

Aviation Red Alert

While it is not only night over Papua New Guinea now, a vast area around the volcano is now likely to be shredded in darkness caused by ash from the eruption.

It is unclear whether the activity at the volcano still continues or has subsided or ended. However, the ash plume has been split in two major portions by winds blowing in different directions at different altitudes:

– the highest portion at 63,000 ft (20 km, flight level 630) is rapidly drifting east and already at more than 500 km distance from the volcano.

– the “lower” part of the plume, up to 55,000 ft (17 km, flight level 550) altitude is instead spreading and drifting more slowly to the south.

The aviation color code is red and all aircraft should avoid the affected areas in a wide distance

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxpua2nv

20 dead as #tsunami hits #Indonesia beaches due to #volcanic activity at Mount #Krakatoa

Tsunami Alert

At least 20 people have been killed as a tidal wave hit beaches around Sunda Strait in Indonesia on Saturday night, according to the country’s Disaster Mitigation Agency. Another 165 have been injured.

The Indonesian Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) said the wave was not caused by an earthquake, but was possibly the result of volcanic activity at Mount Krakatoa.

Video filmed at one of the affected beaches and posted on Twitter shows the wave rolling in as beachgoers scramble away from the water.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/yaayuyyc

Red Alert Issued Due To Strong Eruption With Ash At Manam Volcano In Papua New Guinea

Aviation Red Alert
A relatively large explosive eruption occurred at the volcano yesterday, sending an ash plume to estimated 11 km (34,000 ft) altitude, the Darwin VAAC reported. The ash plume was drifting west over mainland Papua New Guinea and rapidly dissipated. 
 
The Aviation Color Code has been raised from Orange to Red
 
The eruption was likely one of the volcano’s frequent paroxysms involving tall lava fountains from the summit crater with associated lava flows and/or pyroclastic flows covering parts of the northeastern flanks. Thermal emissions from the volcano have been elevated recently, suggesting that there is abundant fresh lava arriving in the summit area. 
 
There are no reports of injuries or fatalities. 
 
Similar ash eruptions have been occurring in the past weeks, most notably on 24 Aug and 23 Sep. On the 24 Aug eruption, an explosive eruption produced a similar ash plume to approx. 15 km (50,000 feet) a.s.l. and lava flows that forced 2000 inhabitants of the small island to flee. 
 
According to a newspaper article, “islanders reported ash and other debris from the volcano was so thick that sunlight was totally blocked for a few hours.”
Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com