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#Explosion at #PiparoMudVolcano Causes #Cracks to #Roads and #Homes in #Trinidad and #Tobago

Piparo Mud Volcano Trinidad & Tobago 22.09.2019

A loud explosion was heard by residents at 10:08 PM, with cracks appearing across roads, & homes at 10:20 PM across Pancho Trace.

11:30 PM Update: Though there has been no confirmed eruption at the Piparo Mud Volcano, there are cracks on the roadway, one home has been damaged due to property cracks, a landslip, and a high sulphur smell according to MP Barry Padarath. He also added, there are no ongoing evacuations but residents are on standby.

Courtesy of Trinidad and Tobago Weather Center

Facebook @TTWeatherCenter

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Alert Level Raised To Orange At #Villarrica #Volcano In Central #Chile

Orange Alert Raised

Sernageomin has raised the alert level to Orange for the first time since 2015 due to escalating seismic tremor and a more turbulent lava lake (present in some form since late 2014). Although fairly unlikely, it is possible that a repeat of the March 2015 paroxysmal event could soon occur if there is a similar trend in activity. An exclusion zone of 2km is in force.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2y6kyqd

#YellowAlert Issued Due To Increased #SeismicActivity At #MaunaLoaVolcano In #Hawaii

Earthquakes under Manua Loa during the past week (image: HVO / USGS)

The alert level for the volcano has been raised to yellow two days ago. This doesn’t mean that an eruption is expected to occur in a near future, but acknowledges that the volcano is currently preparing itself for its next eruption, which will come, sooner or later, but currently without possibility to indicate a specific time frame.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that “for the past several months, earthquake and ground deformation rates at Mauna Loa Volcano have exceeded long term background levels. An eruption is not imminent and current rates are not cause for alarm. However, they do indicate changes in the shallow magma storage system at Mauna Loa.”

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y235wg4r

#Scientist warns #Russian #volcano could cause #Pompeii-scale #destruction

Volcano Alert

A volcano in the far eastern end of Russia that was thought to be extinct may now have awakened — and its eruption could be as severe as the one that destroyed the ancient Roman settlement of Pompeii, according to scientists.

In the fall of 2017, seismic activity was discovered underneath the Bolshaya Udina volcano, which was thought to be inactive for decades.

Since scientists began monitoring the area in 1961, only a single weak activity has been detected, according to the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS).

After the initial activity was discovered, a detailed investigation was launched, which included four temporary seismic stations being placed near the volcano.

Over a two-month period from May to July 2018, 559 localized events were detected in the area of the volcanoes, according to a study that reported the investigation’s findings.

The continued activity led the study to conclude that the volcano may have to be reclassified as “active” given the possible presence of “magma intrusions with a high content of melts and fluids.”

In addition to those events, a 4.3-magnitude earthquake occurred under Udina in February — the strongest to be recorded in that area, according to RAS.

Long-dormant volcanoes pose great risks, according to Ivan Koulakov, the lead scientist investigating the volcano.

“When a volcano is silent for a long time, its first explosion can be catastrophic … Recall Pompeii,” Koulakov told RAS, referencing the ancient Roman settlement Pompeii that was totally destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which was dormant for thousands of years before.

Koulakov also explained that the eruption can have far-flung effects.

“A large amount of ash is thrown into the air, it is carried far away, and not only the surrounding settlements but also large territories all over the planet can suffer,” he said.

This ash can affect air travel and climate, according to CNN.

He pegged the chances of an eruption at 50 per cent.

“At any moment, an eruption can occur,” Koulakov told CNN.

Courtesy of globalnews.ca

https://tinyurl.com/y6ztrv9h

New study confirms monster volcano Katla is charging up for an eruption

Volcano Alert
Katla, a giant volcano hidden beneath the ice cap of Mýrdalsjökull glacier, is busy filling its magma chambers, new research confirms. An eruption in Katla would dwarf the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, scientists have warned. The volcano is long “overdue” for an eruption, as it has historically erupted once every 40-80 years. The last known eruption in Katla was in 1918.
 
A group of Icelandic and British geologists have recently finished a research mission studying gas emissions from the volcano. The studies showed that Katla is emitting enormous quantities of CO2. The volcano releases at least 20 kilotons of C02 every day. Only two volcanoes worldwide are known to emit more CO2, Evgenia Ilyinskaya a volcanologist wit with the University of Leeds told the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service RÚV.  
 
These enormous CO2 emissions confirm significant activity in the volcano, Evgenia told RÚV: “It is highly unlikely that these emissions could be produced by geothermal activity. There must also be a magma build up to release this quantity of gas.”
 
She points out that more studies are needed to determine if the gas emissions from Katla are stable, or if they are increasing. “It is well known from other volcanoes, for example in Hawaii and Alaska, that CO2 emissions increase weeks or years ahead of eruptions. This is a clear sign we need to keep a close eye on Katla. She isn’t just doing nothing, and these findings confirm that there is something going on.”
 
The scientists also detected significant quantities of methane and hydrogen sulfite. These gases can be present in dangerously high quantities where the rivers Emstruá and Múlakvísl emerge from beneath the glacier.
 
Courtesy of icelandmag.is