Tag Archive | Massive Bird Deaths

Thousands of birds are dying in Atlanta, USA

Someone, or something, is killing thousands of birds in Atlanta. Since spring, the death toll began rising every week.
 
For Atlanta office workers, the dead birds are a sad sight at their doorstep. Now, Audubon Society volunteers are tracking and finding the dead or dying birds, many of them in Sandy Springs, Dunwoody and Buckhead.
 
The most frequently found species is the ruby-throated hummingbird.
 
I took the birds’ deaths to heart, searching for the reason why the birds are dying.
 
I find it in our glittering urban architecture.
 
Birds have flown over north Georgia for millions of years, enjoying our trees and water to stop over on annual spring and fall migrations. But now, in the blink of an evolutionary eye, the flocks are finding a deadly obstacle.
 
Flying at night to avoid predators, the birds see brightly lighted skyscrapers. The lights attract attention. The birds fly into the glass walls and fall to their deaths. 
 
Some are casualties of nighttime collisions with windows, while others circle in confusion until they become exhausted. When they land, they fall prey to other urban threats.
 
“Dozens of species are affected, including such priority species — those we’ve identified as most in need of and most likely to benefit from our help —as the Allen’s Hummingbird, Varied Thrush, Golden-winged Warbler, and Seaside Sparrow.”
 
The Audubon Society
 
This spring, for the first time Atlanta joins North Carolina as the only Southern states to combat the bird deaths. It’s a program called Lights Out Atlanta.  First to sign up are Buckhead office towers managed by Highwoods Properties.
 
Vice President Jim Bacchetta acknowledges the threat his buildings pose, saying, “They are big towers, up in the sky, many of them reflective glass. We can’t fix that.”
 
But he can, and did, order that all non-essential lights go out from midnight to sunrise during the months of the Spring and Fall migration.
 
Other Atlanta businesses are looking at what the Lights Out Atlanta pledge can do for the birds.
Courtesy of cbs46.com

1 MILLION+ birds killed since January, due to bird flu in Taiwan

A poultry farm in Liujiao Township of Chiayi County, southern Taiwan, was confirmed Monday to be infected with the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, leading to the culling of 13,349 birds, the county’s Livestock Disease Control Office said.
 
This was the third poultry farm hit by avian influenza subtype H5 in the southern Taiwanese county so far this year, according to data released by the Cabinet-level Council of Agriculture (COA).
 
As of 6 p.m. Monday, a total of 1,009,068 birds have been destroyed at 110 poultry farms infected with highly pathogenic avian flu viruses across Taiwan since the beginning of this year.
 
The infected poultry farms were located in Taoyuan City in northern Taiwan; Changhua and Yunlin counties in central Taiwan; Chiayi, Tainan, Kaohsiung and Pingtung county and cities in the south; and Yilan and Hualien counties in the east, COA data shows.
Courtesy of focustaiwan.tw

18,000 birds killed due to bird flu in Georgia, USA

The Georgia Department of Agriculture reports that the state’s first case of avian influenza (bird flu) has been found in Chattooga County.
 
Chickens, part of a flock of 18,000 birds at a commercial poultry breeding operation tested positive for H7, presumptive low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI). 
 
Officials for the GDA say this is the first confirmation of avian influenza in domestic poultry in Georgia. 
 
Avian influenza does not pose a risk to the food supply, and no affected animals entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low.
 
The virus was identified during routine pre-sale screening for the commercial facility and was confirmed as H7 avian influenza by the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa. As a precaution, the affected flock has been destroyed. 
 
Officials are testing and monitoring other flocks within the surveillance area and no other flocks have tested positive or experienced any clinical signs.
 
Earlier this year, similar confirmations were reported in Alabama, Kentucky and Tennessee.
Courtesy of wrcbtv.com

Hundreds of dead birds found along Zihuatanejo beach, Mexico

Hundreds of dead birds died in the strip of sand of La Ropa beach, as well as in planters, ridges, restaurants and houses bordering that spa, this port of the Costa Grande. Tourists and restaurant owners located on the beach were surprised to see a large number of dead birds, especially zanates and magpies. They explained that some animals were found alive, but died minutes later, while others showed difficulty to fly. They indicated that the area had not been fumigated, so they ruled out intoxication as the possible cause of massive mortality. In addition, they noted that birds feed mainly on what people give them. José Antonio Solís Bucio, a taxi driver at the La Ropa beach site, reported that, very early on, public service workers were preparing to collect all dead birds before tourists arrived. “I counted in a space of the entrance to the beach like 35 dead birds,” he said. So far no authority on Ecology or Environment has made any statement about the situation.
Courtesy of guerrero.quadratin.com.mx
 

25,000 birds dead due to bird flu in Kelantan, Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s northeastern state of Kelantan on Wednesday (Mar 15) declared a disaster to fight the outbreak of H5N1 avian flu after the virus spread to two more districts – Pasir Putih and Bachok.
 
The highly pathogenic bird flu virus was first detected on Mar 6 after a few free-range chickens died outside the state capital Kota Bharu.
 
Eighteen villages in Kota Bharu have been affected and almost 25,000 birds – mainly chickens, ducks and geese – have been culled since the infection was reported.
 
The Kelantan Agriculture and Veterinary Services Department declared the outbreak a state disaster and ordered all agencies and departments to control the outbreak. 
 
The Malaysian Health Ministry’s director general, Noor Hisham, said no human infection has been detected so far but that the ministry is nevertheless on the alert. He added that the virus has not spread to other states, and that the outbreak seems to be contained in Kelantan, which borders Thailand.
 
The public has been told to take precautions, such as reporting to the authorities if they come into contact with dead birds, and to take care of their personal hygiene.
 
The state’s veterinary department believes that the virus could have been spread though infected fighting cocks, like in the last outbreak which occurred in 2004. State authorities have asked the community to avoid cockfighting activities for now.
Courtesy of channelnewsasia.com

23,000 birds killed due to bird flu in Quang Ngai, Vietnam

Quang Ngai Province have culled 23,000 birds since last month in an effort to contain the virus.
 
Authorities in south-central province of Quang Ngai detected another bird flu outbreak, on Tuesday, forcing them to cull over 4,000 infected chickens.
 
The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development of Duc Pho District (Quang Ngai) said the deadly virus was discovered at the poultry farm of one Tran Anh Duong in Chau Me Hamlet, Pho Chau Commune.
 
After a slow die-off began to take hold of his flock, on March 2, Duong contacted the authorities, according to Thanh Nien newspaper.
 
Provincial-level veterinary health officials collected samples at the farm; the results confirmed the appearance of the H5N6 virus.
 
This is the third bird flu outbreak in Duc Pho District and the seventh outbreak detected in Quang Ngai Province since February 7, which forced the local authorities to cull over 23,000 birds.
 
Provincial authorities have authorized livestock and veterinary health officials to use 8,400 liters of iodine to sanitize and sterilize poultry breeding areas.
 
Vietnam has recorded a total of 15 bird flu outbreaks scattered among 11 communes in seven provinces.
 
The country has been racing around the clock to snuff out various strains of the H5N1 virus as they rage through farms in neighboring China and Cambodia.
 
Last month, health and agriculture ministries issued warnings regarding the H7N9 virus, a rare strain first detected in China in March 2013.
 
So far, Vietnam has not reported any cases of the strain.
Courtesy of e.vnexpress.net

55,000 birds killed due to bird flu in Suffolk, UK

About 55,000 birds are to be culled after a new case of bird flu was detected on a farm in Suffolk.
 
The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said the H5N8 strain of avian flu has been found at Grange Farm in Redgrave.
 
Public Health England said the risk to public health from the virus is very low.
 
Gressingham Foods confirmed the birds will be culled, even though none of them currently has avian flu.
 
The strain was detected in the environment, rather than the birds.
 
The discovery follows investigations after avian flu was discovered on a separate poultry farm near Redgrave last month.
 
The premises will be cleansed and disinfected to reduce the risk of further spread, Defra said.
 
A 3km protection zone and 10km surveillance zone are already in place following the previous case.
 
The Food Standards Agency said bird flu does not pose a food safety risk for UK consumers.
Courtesy of BBC News